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Baby Feeding Guide

This post has a Feeding Guide for you plus Questions and Answers for nursing your baby

As with previous posts this is for all of you New and experienced Mothers as there is always something that might help solve a problem that might arise with your new bundle of joy (maybe at the time not so joyful). As we all know, not everything goes to that well laid out plan.

Again I also suggest that you should get your partner to read this as well, they might find some helpful hints here to help share with you.

“My First Baby” Feeding Guide

Providing for your baby’s nourishment is more than just a dietary issue. It also has something to do with comfort and nurturing. A multitude of first-time parents have, in fact, turned to various “my first baby” books and guides for some advice on feeding their babies. Apart from being an excellent way to increase parent-and-baby bonding time, it’s also a wonderful opportunity to just talk to your little bundle of joy.

Since it is your first-time to care for your baby, you definitely need to get hold of all the useful feeding tips you can muster. For starters, take a crack at learning some of the basics of feeding your newborn.

Bottle Feeding

If you choose to feed your newborn with bottled milk, make sure that you prepare everything you need in advance. Just not so far ahead, though, because feeding your little one with spoiled milk is definitely a big “no-no” in parenting.

Remember to have the bottled formula or breast milk at the temperature your baby can tolerate. This can range from lukewarm to room temperature. It is also important to avoid using the microwave for heating the milk up. Doing so will produce hotspots that can injure your baby even if you’ve already checked the liquid’s temperature.

When feeding time comes, hold your baby on your lap while supporting his or her head in the bend of your arm. Try to switch sides from time to time, as you would when breastfeeding, so as to supply ample stimulation on both hemispheres of the brain.

Place the bottle nipple into the baby’s mouth as soon as he or she turns. See to it that the nipple is filled with milk as the baby has a tendency to gulp down too much air from a half-filled nipple. To terminate a feeding session, simply remove the Bottle from your baby’s mouth.

Breastfeeding

One good thing about breastfeeding is the fact that you’re not required to prepare the milk or warm the feeding bottle in advance. Plus, you can pick out any position you want to nurse in. The appropriate feeding positions, however, may vary according to the baby’s age, the time of day, and your level of comfort.

Many mothers make use of the cradle hold when breastfeeding. This well-liked feeding position requires you to sit upright and hold your little one like a cradle. In addition, it also allows you to cuddle your baby with one hand, and move or support your breast with the other. Regardless of what nursing position you choose, don’t forget to acquire some support. A nursing pillow or any regular cushion will certainly make it easier for you to hold the baby up and to prevent neck or back strain. When it comes to baby placement, an excellent latch is one of the most vital parts of a comfortable feeding session. Your little bundle of joy should be chin-to-breast and belly-to-belly with you.

To ensure that the feeding is going well, check if the baby’s lips are flared around your breast. You may also pull his or her lower lip down a little to see if the tongue is coiled around the areola. You can also hear the baby swallow or notice his or her ears wiggling during active feeding. In case you need to change sides or if the feeding session has to end, simply slide a finger in one corner of the baby’s mouth to tenderly interrupt the suction.

Needless to say, first-time parents are not really expected to impeccably perform the feeding process the first time around. So try to be patient and give yourself a break every now and then. Keeping a positive outlook on parenting and taking advantage of all the available “my first baby” resources will also help you a lot.                                                      

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The following could be of some help to you! 

Mother & Baby:  Nursing Questions & Answers

 

Q. How often should I nurse a newborn infant?

A. No less than 8 times per day, depending on how long he gives you at night. If he can go 4 hours, you'll probably see two feedings in between 11:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m. If you tank him up right before you go to bed, you may only have one.

 

Q. How often should I nurse an older baby?

A. Depending on your child's age, you should be on a 3-4 hour routine during the day. Remember, as your child gets older, the frequency of nursing sessions will drop off, but he will be eating more at each session. If you are committed to nursing past 6 months of age, it's not recommended that you drop below 5 feedings per day. If you believe your milk supply is waning and you don't want to stop breastfeeding, add a feeding or two to your daily routine in order to increase your milk supply

 

Q. How do I drop a feeding as my baby grows?

A. The most common changes are moms who want to switch from a 3 to a 3.5 hour routine or a 3.5 to a 4 hour routine, babies who are ready to drop their middle of the night feeding, or parents who are ready to stop the late-night feeding.

 

Most often you'll know when your baby is ready to switch by a change in his sleep patterns. A baby on a 3 hour routine typically takes 3 naps per day (morning, afternoon, late afternoon) and the switchover to a 3.5 hour routine will see a shortening of one of those naps or the dropping of the last nap of the day. Babies are generally ready for this switch by about 12 weeks of age.

 

Dropping the middle of the night feeding is most often accomplished by the baby himself between 7-14 weeks of age. You'll know your baby is ready when he doesn't wake you up until 6:00 a.m. or so, and you'll probably wake in a panic that morning, realizing you weren't beckoned in the middle of the night. He will require more food during the day from this point on, and your breasts will likely be overly full for several days, but it's all good!

 

Stopping the late night feeding is typically the trickiest to do. Many parents are reluctant to drop it, thinking that if they do, their baby will wake in the middle of the night, starving. If you think he cannot drop the feeding completely, back it up in 15-minute increments until you arrive at your desired time. If his last two feedings of the day are closer than your flexible schedule says it "should be," don't worry. It's a temporary fix, and that's what flexibility is all about.

The routine serves you, not the other way around!

 

Thank you for checking out this post and I hope this has been a help to you and yours.

The Next Post

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The next post will be about

Weaning From Breast Feeding

Training the Fussy Eater

WHAT TO DO WHEN YOUR KIDS CRY?

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Remember to check with your health practitioner

as to the practicality of any changes or program you choose.

It cannot be detrimental

to you or your babies’ health.

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Kind regards and the best for you and "bubs",
Laurie Mills

Disclaimer:

This information is not presented by a medical practitioner and is for educational and informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read.

Since natural and or dietary supplements are not FDA approved they must be accompanied by a two-part disclaimer on the product that the statement has not been evaluated by the FDA and that the product is not intended to “diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease”.

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27.02 | 04:30

Amazing!!!!! Thank you for all the good info...

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